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Girls Daring Greatly: Elements of vulnerability and strength in a therapeutic wilderness setting.

Posted by Sabrina Marie Hadeed, MA, LPC, NCC on February 26, 2014 | 0 comment(s)

hadeedWhen discussing the idea of girls in the wilderness, the topic of vulnerability comes up a lot. Often it is in the context of how girls are vulnerable in fragile ways that we often want to protect or tuck away. However, having been a teenage girl myself and having worked as a therapist now for 8 years – I can confidently say that vulnerability among girls in the wilderness has more to do with courage and resilience than anything else. Brene Brown is one of the leading researchers on the study of vulnerability and shame. In her most recent book (Daring greatly: how the courage to be vulnerable transforms the way we live, love, parent, and lead) she highlights relevant themes such as: learning to embrace imperfections, letting the people we love struggle, and other elements of healing our shame. The book’s title was inspired by Theodore Roosevelt’s Citizen’s Republic (1910) speech where he says: “It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.”

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Promising Results for Young Adults…

Posted by Evoke Therapy Programs on February 03, 2014 | 0 comment(s)

A Second Nature Study, Published in the Journal of Residential Treatment of Children and Youth, Suggests Promising Results for Young Adults in Wilderness Therapy

The Journal of Residential Treatment for Children and Youth published an article by Second Nature researchers entitled, “Efficacy of Wilderness Therapy for Young Adults: A First Look”. This is one of the first studies examining outcomes for young adults in wilderness therapy, and suggests promising results for this group.

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“A Brand New Life”—One Student’s Brave Journey… A Journal by Caite

Posted by Evoke Therapy Programs on February 03, 2014 | 0 comment(s)

My Journey: Second Nature Entrada
October 22, 2012- December 18, 2012

My journey at Second Nature Entrada is one I will never forget. It was the start of the rest of my life. The feelings and emotions I had before entering the wilderness were ones I never thought would change. Feelings of emptiness, heavy sadness, hopelessness and anger swirled in my body as I boarded the plane to go to Utah. I remember feeling anxious and overwhelmed, not knowing what to expect and not knowing what I had just signed myself up for. At this point I felt this program was my last shot at living, feeling like if it didn’t “work” I was destined to committing suicide. I held my breath, my heart beating out of my chest… I got off the plane, ready or not– my journey begins.

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Introducing family & friends to the idea of Second Nature… a webinar for resiliency

Posted by Evoke Therapy Programs on September 10, 2013 | 0 comment(s)

One of the best things about the Second Nature Wilderness program is the reverence we have for our families and their parallel healing process while their son or daughter is in treatment with us. Weekly calls, assignments, therapeutically focused letters, and family assignments round out our clinically focused process. The extent of our family program is second to none and we ask all of our parents to participate. Jennifer Graham is a skilled professional who runs our parent support groups in the bay area and in Los Angeles, and I run them here in Manhattan.We provide direct support in these in person monthly groups, but a unique process and psycho-educational piece arrives weekly in the form of our Webinars. Second Nature Webinars are live, online, run by our Special Projects manager, Patrick Logan and facilitated by Second Nature Co-Founder, Dr. Brad Reedy and other Second Nature therapists. Live, one hour, open-forum sessions are given each week. We provide client family members the opportunity to ask questions on a variety of topics. Additionally, client family members have access to an expansive library (over 100) of archived sessions. This has proved to be invaluable to our parents.

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Defining Wilderness Therapy

Posted by Rick Heizer, Partner and Program Director on August 23, 2013 | 0 comment(s)

heizerRecently a reputable wilderness therapist presented on the effectiveness of wilderness therapy at the American Psychology Association conference. Upon his return he shared his presentation was grouped in the same category as dance therapy! This is an amusing illustration of the confusion in defining wilderness therapy. A growing number of behavioral healthcare professionals are asking what should and shouldn’t be considered “wilderness therapy.” With interpretations ranging from boot camp to adventure trips there is an obvious need for a clear definition of wilderness therapy. A clear definition provides universal understanding of what wilderness therapy is and the extensive benefits gained from it.

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Application of Principles of Group Therapy to the Wilderness Setting

Posted by Matt Hoag, Ph.D. on July 23, 2013 | 0 comment(s)

1matt resizedIrvin Yalom1 identified eleven factors that contribute to healthy functioning in group therapy, which therapists may use to facilitate meaningful and effective interventions. Application of these factors to the wilderness therapy experience allows clinicians to both understand wilderness therapy on a more sophisticated level and to design interventions that serve to highlight or develop any of the factors.

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Open Space and Room to Breathe

Posted by Mike Bergeron on July 09, 2013 | 5 comment(s)

The sun was setting on this particular balmy evening in October. A gentle breeze rustled through the juniper trees and brought wafts of sweet smelling sage across the open field near where the group was camped. The temperature was that perfect in-between: not real warm or real chilly. It was altogether different than the images of red rock formations and sprawling cactus that comes to mind when one thinks of the southwest, but then this was autumn in the high desert.

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