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Viewing entries tagged with 'challenge'

The Other Side of Fear: Fostering a Growth Mindset in a Wilderness Setting

Posted by John Tobias, MS, ACMHC, Therapist at Entrada on March 29, 2018 | 4 comment(s)

Why do some people succeed while some who are equally talented do not? What is it about wilderness that can produce such dramatic results? The foundation from which both answers arise is one of mindset. Mindset, in this case, refers to the mental, emotional and cognitive structures used to process one’s experience. Another way of understanding this idea is asking this question: “What kind of meaning is being created out of any given experience?” Yet another question to help clarify is: “Is learning occurring from a given experience?” The concept of mindset is germane to both answers.

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Adolescent Girls and Wilderness Therapy: Can They Handle It?

Posted by Sabrina Marie Hadeed, Ph.D., Assistant Clinical Director & Therapist at Cascades on December 18, 2017 | 1 comment(s)

1sabrina resizedThe title of this blog was a tough one for me to type. My internal answer to the question is always a bold and resounding, “YES, of course, and why is that even a question?” But it is a question and a concern that I have heard from many parents contemplating Wilderness Therapy for their adolescent daughters over the past few years. After consulting with adolescent boys Wilderness Therapists, my suspicion about this gender stereotype was confirmed. It seems that the boy's groups get very few (if any) questions about their capacity to “handle it”.

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The Struggle is Real

Posted by Morgan Robak, CSWA, Therapist at Cascades on February 01, 2016 | 5 comment(s)

I worked for 11 months as a field staff before becoming a Wilderness Therapist. As a member of the field staff team, I have memories of the therapists coming into the groups and shaking things up after we developed a rhythm within our group for the week. At the time, I did not understand this approach. Why leave students feeling sad or upset, letting them deal with these feelings on their own?

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