Blog

Applying For A Field Staff Position At Evoke

Posted by Lindsey Bosse, Assistant Field Director at Cascades on December 07, 2017 | 0 comment(s)

In my last year of college, I began feeling the pressure to know what my next steps would be after I donned my cap and gown and left academia. I spent equal time scouring the internet for positions as I did formatting my bibliography for my thesis. When I found Evoke, I was beyond excited to have found this miraculous company that blended my interest in psychology with my wilderness skills. One of the most valuable things I learned in my process of applying to Evoke was the power of effective communication and patience. I applied to Evoke in January of 2013, and was not contacted about an interview until sometime in late March, for the orientation that was scheduled in June. I joined the team as a field instructor in early July of the same year, and haven’t left. As the Assistant Field Director at our Cascades branch, I now have the pleasure of recruiting field staff. Having been an eager applicant myself, I thought it would be important to share the process of recruiting for all of you as you embark on the journey of applying to be a part of Evoke.

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Shattered Fantasies

Posted by Alumni Parent on November 28, 2017 | 3 comment(s)

So much of my suffering in relation to my son--and probably with most everything else for that matter--is my desire for things to be different than they actually are—a seemingly plain and simple truth. If only I could settle into what is actually occurring. Like when it rains, and I desire the sun to be out, I perpetuate the desire for the sun to be shining by choosing to feel agitated about the rain. So, instead of simply saying to myself, today looks like it’s going to be dark and rainy, I suppose instead of hiking I will get on the treadmill,” I become agitated and disappointed, which only perpetuates my suffering. I’m purposely using this scenario of the weather to demonstrate what happens in my mind when I’m caught in the cycle of wanting things—things I cannot change or control—to be different than they are. The arena where this is most profound is motherhood.

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Admission, The Price Of

Posted by Jakob Gowell, Former Field Staff on November 22, 2017 | 0 comment(s)

“Possibly the greatest crime we commit against each other is this daily show of normality… The comment ‘Don’t mind him, he’s got a problem’ illustrates this universal attitude toward personal difficulty. The implication is that having a problem is a strange and avoidable weakness. When I come in repeated contact with this daily facade of normality I begin to assume that I too deserve such a life, and I get annoyed with the present and look upon my difficulties as unjust. And because I assume there is something unnatural about my having a problem, I too attempt to present a problem-free appearance.”
-Hugh Prather, Notes to Myself

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Why We Keep Making Outside Magazine's Top 100 Jobs List

Posted by Noah Schmelzer, Field Instructor at Evoke Entrada on November 15, 2017 | 2 comment(s)

NoahWhen asked to offer my perspective on the company I work for, Evoke at Entrada, in relation to its recognition in Outside Magazine’s top 100 list, a very simple thing hit me: I noticed that I address the company as ‘we’. “Why we made Outside Magazine’s top 100 best job list?”. “I’d love to write a blog post about us.” That’s right, over the last three and a half years that I’ve been a Field Instructor I have felt included in the company as an integral part of its functioning. From our newest field staff to the Program Director, there is a feeling of inclusion and care. There are what I consider the basics of care for a company; an appropriate wage, support with health care, proper working conditions and support, etc. Evoke has gone beyond what I expected. The following, I believe, are some of the reasons that for the last three years we have made Outside Magazine’s top 100 list for best places to work.

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Meeting Resistance with Compassion

Posted by Lauren Roberts, LPC, Therapist at Cascades on November 06, 2017 | 0 comment(s)

Lauren RobertsA tool I find myself teaching almost every parent I work with is to LAV on their children. LAV stands for Listen-Acknowledge-Validate. So often with the people we love most, we skip these three key steps and charge head first into fixing and finding a solution. I too am guilty of this both as a therapist and as a human. By skipping these three steps we often set ourselves up for what feels like resistance from the other person. But can you blame them? Two of our most basic human needs include feeling connected and understood. I personally do not feel either when someone swoops in and tells me how to fix my problem, how to be better. In fact in that moment I feel like the underlying message is “you are broken, you’re not good enough.” I may eventually want to brainstorm and figure out a solution but first I really just want to be heard, seen, listened to.

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