Blog

I Am A Survivor

Posted by Belinda Chaplin on September 08, 2016 | 6 comment(s)

112 1Let me start by introducing myself…..my name is Belinda Chaplin, I am a born and raised Mid Nebraska Girl! My husband Jason and I have been married for 13 years the end of August. We have been blessed with two children, Brice (age 10) and Brinlee (age 7)!

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What If My Child Is Suicidal?

Posted by Brad Reedy, Owner & Clinical Director at Evoke Therapy Programs on September 05, 2016 | 0 comment(s)

Evoke Brad Headshot 3 of 3Someone told me not to write on this subject unless I was prepared to write another book. They suggested, “Nothing you write, no matter how much, will be enough to answer the questions a grieving parent can ask.” Many reports suggest the greatest tragedy that a person can experience—which becomes compounded if the death is the result of a suicide—is the death of a child. As a father of four, I cannot imagine losing one of my children, and I cannot imagine how I would manage to go on with that kind of grief. I assume this is a wound from which I would never fully recover. When I am asked the question about how far a parent should go to essentially ensure their child’s survival, I cannot answer it. No therapist or expert can ever answer that question. Even if we did, and the parents followed our advice exactly, yet their child still took his or her own life, then the parents would likely blame both us and themselves for not doing more.

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Addiction Is A Family Issue - There Is A Family Solution

Posted by Tim Harrington, Family Recovery School of Colorado on September 01, 2016 | 0 comment(s)

Tim HarringtonOur "family intervention” approach works because it focuses on the total picture and all of the people and dynamics involved. We do not single out the addicted loved one as “the problem” and we don't let labels and myths keep him or her from being held responsible for either fixing the problems or living with the consequences. More importantly, we work with the family members who want the situation to change, ignoring the addicted loved one, who obviously has a vested interest in things staying the same.

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Arrive: The Evoke Parent Workshop Experience

Posted by Sabrina Marie Hadeed, MA, LPC Assistant Clinical Director & Therapist at Cascades on August 29, 2016 | 2 comment(s)

1sabrina resizedWe arrived early at the conference space adjacent to the ever-flowing Deschutes River to set up for the first day of our Parent Workshop. Right away I noticed the tables and chairs had been arranged in straight rows from the front of the room to the back, modeling a standard classroom style. I took a deep breath and with a smile I enlisted help to immediately move the tables out of the way so that the chairs could be arranged in one large circle to accommodate the twenty parents and five Evoke participants.

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Playing With Fire: A Clinical View On Bow Drill Fire

Posted by Morgan Robak, CSWA, Therapist at Cascades on August 24, 2016 | 0 comment(s)

morgantempSmoke billowing from a juniper root, a sage spindle spinning quickly, the smell of a coal forming on the fire board, in the middle of the desert, watching as an expert field staff made fire with sticks and her hands, I became mesmerized, fascinated and a little scared. “I am expected to do that?” I thought as I was sent off on my solo experience shortly after watching someone make fire within 10 seconds. I was left wondering if I was capable of this job, if it were possible for me to make fire like she did. Only one percent of the population can make fire using a bow drill, and they expect me to join that statistic. I was terrified. IMG 3775The journey of making fire was frustrating. I saw students who were better at it than I was, while staff who sat patiently next to me as I worked on my own fire set. Its 90% preparation, 10% skill, I heard over and over. The pressure was intense and I knew I had to “bust” 14 fires before I could move up a level as a field staff and no longer an intern. I wanted it more and more as I worked on my set and had bloody knuckles from the spindle whipping my hands as it flew off the fire board because I did not have enough down pressure, or my bow string was too loose. All the pieces needed to fit together to be successful. I had to look at all the moving parts, one piece was not more important than the other. They all needed to hold their own as they worked together.

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What Will I Take Home From The Wilderness?

Posted by Jason Sibley, Field Director at Cascades on August 16, 2016 | 0 comment(s)

IMG 3109I’ve worked in the wilderness and through experiential education for 8+ years and believe more passionately than ever in the simple, tangible, and connective benefits we take home from every wilderness experience. Having just worked a 20-day wilderness course, I feel a renewed sense of appreciation for these take-home skills and lessons. Here are five you can expect to experience and benefit from long after you leave the field:

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How Can Wilderness Therapy Help Teens On The Spectrum With Aspergers, Autism And Non-Verbal Learning Disability?

Posted by J Juffine, Ph.D., Licensed Psychologist, Owner & Clinical Director at Cascades on August 02, 2016 | 0 comment(s)

1j resizedIndividuals with characteristics associated with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) have it harder than the average person. Life is more difficult. The degree of difficulty varies, depending on the degree of Autism, but there are certain areas that are problematic. Gillberg (1991) identified the following areas:

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Nature Spirit: Exploring Spirituality In The Wilderness

Posted by Elise Mitchell, BS, RYT, Health and Wellness Coordinator at Entrada on July 26, 2016 | 2 comment(s)

Elise MitchellI’ve been asked… repeatedly… to write more specifically about spirituality. It’s been a daunting request for me because spirituality is a nebulous and highly personal subject. It’s both transcendent and human, sublime and mundane. In the scientific literature regarding spirituality’s role (often muddled with religion) in mental health, a consensus on its help or hindrance is yet to be found. While religious guilt seems to have an adverse effect on mental health, feeling connected to something greater than ourselves seems to help mitigate stress and depression.1

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